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From the Vault: News from the Wednesday, Aug. 22, 1973 edition of the Press & Journal

Posted 8/30/17

Hoffer Park’s rebuilding OK’d; borough gets $238,000 from Pennsylvania, U.S.

Middletown’s project to rehabilitate flood-damaged Hoffer Park has been given the green light — financially. …

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From the Vault: News from the Wednesday, Aug. 22, 1973 edition of the Press & Journal

Posted

Hoffer Park’s rebuilding OK’d; borough gets $238,000 from Pennsylvania, U.S.

Middletown’s project to rehabilitate flood-damaged Hoffer Park has been given the green light — financially.

The go-ahead signal has been motivated by the release of federal and state funds. The borough was granted authority some weeks ago to advertise for bids as a preliminary move to prepare for the park project.

Locally, Middletown will receive a total of $238,000 to rebuild and repair the borough’s popular recreation center.

The borough’s input will amount to $30,000. The state has approved $3 million for repairing flood-damaged park and recreation facilities and completing flood-related recreation projects, Senator Martin Murray announced.

The money will go for 56 municipal recreation projects across the state. Some of the funds will also be used to restore park land on which emergency mobile homes for flood victims were placed. Four projects were approved for Dauphin County. In addition to Middletown, grants were OK’d for Harrisburg’s city-owned island, and parks in Lykens and Millersburg.

Murray and Community Affairs Secretary William H. Wilcox, whose department will run the program, made the announcement at a news conference last week in Wilkes-Barre. Wilcox said the U. S. Bureau of Outdoor Recreation will provide an additional $2.28 million in federal funds for the projects.

He praised James Watts, director of the bureau, and Maurice Arnold, its regional director, for their cooperation in the program.

Most of the 56 projects involve recreation facilities damaged in the record floods of June 1972. The rest are recreation projects for flood-struck communities begun before June 1972, but never completed.

“The projects submitted to the state represent each community’s sense of priorities for its recreation program,” Wilcox said. “But the total amount being spent by the state and federal governments — more than $5 million — represents our commitment to meeting the recreation needs of flood-damaged areas.”

The state funds will come from the special disaster assistance appropriation passed by the General Assembly last year. They are the first state funds to be approved for restoration of municipal flood-hit recreation facilities.

The Community Affairs Department previously approved $400,000 to support recreation activities in flood-damaged areas.

Area school district lists dress code

In the face of last year’s legal decision which struck down their case against seven students with long hair, an Advisory Committee on Discipline believes the value of good appearance should be taught and practiced in the Middletown Area School District.

The committee of 25 members represents school administration, parents and students.

Their philosophy: A well-dressed and well-groomed student body is a well-disciplined student body.

The committee has recommended a dress code for the 1973-74 school term. Generally, it calls for all students to be clean and neat in appearance in order that a safe, healthy and educationally conducive atmosphere may be maintained.

Male students are urged to wear slacks and shirts or other similar tops. Girls are asked to wear dresses or skirts, blouses, sweaters or other similar tops. All shirts made to be concealed should be tucked in. If there are belt loops, a belt should be worn.

Male students are urged to keep their hair trimmed, free of the eyes, and be clean shaven. Girls are not to wear excessive makeup.

Bare midriffs or torsos are considered a distraction in an educational setting and forbidden. Fringed, frayed, torn or clothing dragging the floor is taboo because it is considered unsafe. Likewise, no clothing should be worn so short, tight or immodest that it is a distraction to education.

Slogans, words or patches are not permitted on clothing if considered a distraction.

Headlines from the edition

• 4-H’er Erna Wagner to leave for India

• Identification “by the numbers” holds potential for public abuse

• Warn against home burglaries on Labor Day

• Woodchuck hunters urged to be safe

Hot buys

• Zenith 23-inch Super Chromacolor Super Console television, $499. GE automatic electric clothes dryer, $129. Cullen-Singer’s, Wood and Wilson streets, Middletown.

• Cotton underwear (men’s T-shirts, briefs), three for $2.22. 100-count aspirin, 2 for 25 cents. Boys’ knit flares (pants), $4.96. Planters dry-roasted peanuts, 63 cents. Kresge’s, Olmsted Plaza.

• Clorox, 1 gallon, 55 cents. Coca-Cola, 8 10-ounce non-returnables, 99 cents. Musselman’s cider vinegar, 29 cents a quart. Evans Thrift Market, 241 Oak Hill Drive, Middletown.

• Diamond solitaires priced by the carat. One-quarter carat total weight, $129. Double value for lovers, gold wedding duo, $17.88 for both rings. Good-time buys from Timex, $7.95 and up. Royal Jewel Box, Olmsted Plaza.

• One-pound bag of Hershey’s Kisses, two for $1. Grants, 450 E. Main St., Middletown.

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